mrin20180630_10q.htm
 

 

Table of Contents



UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, DC 20549

 


 

FORM 10-Q

 


 

(Mark One)

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended September 30, 2018

 

OR

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from              to             

 

Commission File Number: 001-35838

 


Marin Software Incorporated

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter)

 


 

Delaware

20-4647180

(State or Other Jurisdiction of

Incorporation or Organization)

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

   

123 Mission Street, 27th Floor, San Francisco, CA

94105

(Address of Principal Executive Offices)

(Zip Code)

 

(415) 399-2580

(Registrant’s Telephone Number, Including Area Code)

 


 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  ☒    No  ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter time period that the registrant was required to submit such files).    Yes  ☒    No  ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer

 

  

Accelerated filer

 

Non-accelerated filer

 

  

Smaller reporting company

 

Emerging growth company

 

       

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ☒

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes  ☐    No  ☒

 

As of November 6, 2018, the registrant had 5,792,000 shares of common stock outstanding.

 



 

1

 

 

Table of Contents

 

PART I.

FINANCIAL INFORMATION

3

Item 1.

Financial Statements (unaudited).

3
 

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS AT SEPTEMBER 30, 2018 AND DECEMBER 31, 2017

3
 

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE LOSS FOR THE THREE AND NINE MONTHS ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 2018 AND 2017

4
 

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS FOR THE NINE MONTHS ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 2018 AND 2017

5
 

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

6

Item 2.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

19

Item 3.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.

28

Item 4.

Controls and Procedures.

29

PART II

OTHER INFORMATION

30

ITEM 1.

LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

30

ITEM 1A.

RISK FACTORS

30

ITEM 2.

UNREGISTERED SALES OF EQUITY SECURITIES AND USE OF PROCEEDS

47

ITEM 3.

DEFAULTS UPON SENIOR SECURITIES

47

ITEM 4.

MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

47

ITEM 5.

OTHER INFORMATION

47

ITEM 6.

EXHIBITS

48

SIGNATURES

49

 

2

 

PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Financial Statements (unaudited).

 

 

MARIN SOFTWARE INCORPORATED

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(Unaudited)

(in thousands, except par value)

 

   

At September 30,

   

At December 31,

 
   

2018

     2017*  

Assets

               

Current assets

               

Cash and cash equivalents

  $ 13,397     $ 27,544  

Restricted cash

    1,293       1,293  

Accounts receivable, net

    8,666       12,237  

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

    4,937       3,989  

Total current assets

    28,293       45,063  

Property and equipment, net

    12,742       15,559  

Goodwill

    1,968       16,768  

Intangible assets, net

    2,536       4,475  

Other non-current assets

    2,399       1,504  

Total assets

  $ 47,938     $ 83,369  

Liabilities and Stockholders' Equity

               

Current liabilities

               

Accounts payable

  $ 2,045     $ 2,826  

Accrued expenses and other current liabilities

    8,862       10,474  

Capital lease obligations

    1,392       1,416  

Total current liabilities

    12,299       14,716  

Capital lease obligations, non-current

    741       1,687  

Other long-term liabilities

    4,017       4,183  

Total liabilities

    17,057       20,586  

Commitments and contingencies (Note 13)

               

Stockholders’ equity

               

Common stock, $0.001 par value - 142,857 shares authorized, 5,790 and 5,729 shares issued and outstanding at September 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively

    6       6  

Additional paid-in capital

    294,135       291,163  

Accumulated deficit

    (262,351 )     (227,704 )

Accumulated other comprehensive loss

    (909 )     (682 )

Total stockholders’ equity

    30,881       62,783  

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity

  $ 47,938     $ 83,369  

 

*

Derived from the Company’s audited consolidated financial statements as of December 31, 2017.

 

See accompanying notes to the condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

3

 

 

MARIN SOFTWARE INCORPORATED

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE LOSS

(Unaudited)

(in thousands, except per share data)

 

   

Three Months Ended September 30,

   

Nine Months Ended September 30,

 
   

2018

   

2017

   

2018

   

2017

 
Revenues, net   $ 13,153     $ 18,224     $ 42,806     $ 57,299  
Cost of revenues     6,459       8,256       20,994       24,787  
Gross profit     6,694       9,968       21,812       32,512  

Operating expenses

                               
Sales and marketing     5,296       6,630       18,831       20,016  
Research and development     5,471       6,672       17,443       20,456  
General and administrative     2,921       3,920       10,064       12,042  

Impairment of goodwill

    14,740             14,740       2,797  
Total operating expenses     28,428       17,222       61,078       55,311  
Loss from operations     (21,734 )     (7,254 )     (39,266 )     (22,799 )
Other income (expenses), net     336       (144 )     1,008       (445 )
Loss before provision for income taxes     (21,398 )     (7,398 )     (38,258 )     (23,244 )
Provision for income taxes     (96 )     (151 )     (624 )     (976 )
Net loss     (21,494 )     (7,549 )     (38,882 )     (24,220 )
Foreign currency translation adjustments     (93 )     585       (227 )     1,923  
Comprehensive loss   $ (21,587 )   $ (6,964 )   $ (39,109 )   $ (22,297 )
Net loss per share available to common stockholders, basic and diluted (Note 11)   $ (3.71 )   $ (1.34 )   $ (6.75 )   $ (4.31 )
Weighted-average shares used to compute net loss per share available to common stockholders, basic and diluted     5,787       5,651       5,763       5,625  

Stock-based compensation expense is allocated as follows (Note 9):

                               
Cost of revenues   $ 160     $ 166     $ 536     $ 629  
Sales and marketing     181       197       692       609  
Research and development     339       326       992       1,640  
General and administrative     195       234       713       805  

Amortization of intangible assets is allocated as follows (Note 4):

                               
Cost of revenues   $ 234     $ 240     $ 704     $ 732  
Sales and marketing     130       216       527       661  
Research and development     234       239       705       730  

General and administrative

          5       3       28  

Restructuring related expenses are allocated as follows (Note 5):

                               
Cost of revenues   $ 37     $     $ 176     $  
Sales and marketing     113             658        

Research and development

                115        
General and administrative     11             158        

 

See accompanying notes to the condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

4

 

 

MARIN SOFTWARE INCORPORATED

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(Unaudited)

(in thousands)

 

   

Nine Months Ended September 30,

 
   

2018

   

2017

 

Operating activities

               

Net loss

  $ (38,882 )   $ (24,220 )

Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities

               

Impairment of goodwill

    14,740       2,797  

Depreciation

    2,185       3,748  

Amortization of internally developed software

    2,871       2,671  

Amortization of intangible assets

    1,939       2,151  

Loss (gain) on disposals of property and equipment

    3       (11 )

Amortization of deferred costs to obtain and fulfill contracts

    1,624        

Unrealized foreign currency (gains) losses

    (12 )     795  

Non-cash interest expense related to debt agreements

          15  

Stock-based compensation related to equity awards and restricted stock

    2,933       3,683  

(Recovery from) provision for bad debts

    (194 )     1,040  

Changes in operating assets and liabilities

               

Accounts receivable

    3,773       4,798  

Prepaid expenses and other assets

    (824 )     (1,057 )

Accounts payable

    (751 )     (692 )

Accrued expenses and other liabilities

    (181 )     27  

Net cash used in operating activities

    (10,776 )     (4,255 )

Investing activities

               

Purchases of property and equipment

    (580 )     (351 )

Proceeds from disposal of property and equipment

    3       11  

Capitalization of internally developed software

    (1,693 )     (1,398 )

Net cash used in investing activities

    (2,270 )     (1,738 )

Financing activities

               

Repayments of capital lease obligations

    (971 )     (788 )

Employee taxes paid for withheld shares upon equity award settlement

    (137 )     (212 )

Proceeds from employee stock purchase plan, net

    249       215  

Net cash used in financing activities

    (859 )     (785 )

Effect of foreign exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents and restricted cash

    (242 )     1,714  

Net decrease in cash and cash equivalents and restricted cash

    (14,147 )     (5,064 )

Cash and cash equivalents and restricted cash

               

Beginning of period

    28,837       35,713  

End of period

  $ 14,690     $ 30,649  

Supplemental disclosure of non-cash investing and financing activities

               

Issuance of common stock under employee stock purchase plan

  $ 172     $ 130  

Purchases of property and equipment recorded in accounts payable and accrued expenses

    2       693  

Acquisition of equipment through capital leases

          181  

 

See accompanying notes to the condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

5

 

Marin Software Incorporated

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

(dollars and share numbers in thousands, except per share data)

 

 

1. Summary of Business and Significant Accounting Policies

 

Marin Software Incorporated (the “Company”) was incorporated in Delaware in March 2006. The Company provides a leading cross-channel, cross-device, enterprise marketing software platform for search, social, display and eCommerce advertising channels, offered as a software-as-a-service, or SaaS, solution for advertisers and agencies. The Company’s platform enables digital marketers to improve financial performance, realize efficiencies and time savings, and make better business decisions. The Company’s corporate headquarters are located in San Francisco, California, and the Company has additional offices in the following locations: Austin, Chicago, Dublin, London, New York, Paris, Portland, Shanghai and Tokyo.

 

Liquidity

 

The Company has incurred significant losses in each fiscal year since its incorporation in 2006 and management expects such losses to continue over the next several years. The Company incurred a net loss of $38,882 for the nine months ended September 30, 2018, and a net loss of $31,491 for the year ended December 31, 2017. As of September 30, 2018, the Company had an accumulated deficit of $262,351. The Company had cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash of $14,690 as of September 30, 2018. Management expects to incur additional losses and experience negative cash flows in the future. To continue to fund operations, including research and development, the Company will need to seek opportunities to increase revenues, lower costs and/or raise additional capital. In January 2018, the Company initiated organizational restructuring plans (see Note 5), which are expected to result in significant cost savings in 2018 and 2019. The Company believes that its cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash will provide sufficient funds for the Company to continue as a going concern for at least 12 months from the date of issuance of these condensed consolidated financial statements. This determination is based on projections that are predicated on the Company achieving certain minimum levels of sales from its search, social, display and eCommerce advertising channels.

 

Basis of Presentation and Consolidation

 

The accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements and condensed footnotes have been prepared in accordance with the instructions to Form 10-Q and Article 10 of Regulation S-X. Accordingly, they do not include all of the information and footnotes required by United States generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”) for complete financial statements. In the opinion of management, all adjustments, consisting of only normal recurring items, considered necessary for fair statement have been included. The results of operations for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018 are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected for the year ending December 31, 2018, or for other interim periods or for future years.

 

The accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its wholly owned subsidiaries. All intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated on consolidation. The condensed consolidated balance sheet as of December 31, 2017 is derived from audited financial statements as of that date but does not include all of the information and footnotes required by GAAP for complete financial statements.

 

These condensed consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and related notes included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K, as amended, for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2017, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) on March 5, 2018.

 

Reclassifications

 

When necessary, reclassifications have been made to prior period financial information to conform to the current period presentation.

 

Reverse Stock Split and Reduction in Authorized Shares

 

On October 5, 2017, the Company effected a reverse stock split of its outstanding common stock. As a result of the reverse stock split, each seven outstanding shares of the Company’s common stock was combined into one outstanding share of common stock, without any change in par value. In addition, the number of authorized shares of common stock was reduced from 500,000 shares to 142,857 shares. All share and per share amounts of the Company’s common stock, as well as stock options and restricted stock units (“RSUs”) included in the accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements have been presented to give effect to the reverse stock split for all periods presented.

 

Financial Instruments

 

The Company’s financial instruments, including accounts receivable, accounts payable and accrued expenses are carried at cost, which approximates fair value because of the short-term nature of those instruments. Based on borrowing rates available to the Company for loans with similar terms and maturities, and in consideration of the Company’s credit risk profile, the carrying value of outstanding capital lease obligations (Note 5) approximates fair value as well.

 

 

Cash equivalents consist of money market funds, which are readily convertible into cash and have original maturity dates of less than three months from the date of their respective purchases. These money market funds presented as cash equivalents on the consolidated balance sheets are classified as level 1 within the fair value hierarchy, and totaled $3,809 and $8,831 as of September 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively.

 

Allowances for Doubtful Accounts and Revenue Credits

 

The allowance for doubtful accounts reflects the Company’s best estimate of probable losses inherent in the Company’s receivables portfolio determined on the basis of historical experience, specific allowances for known troubled accounts and other currently available evidence. The Company performs a regular review of its customers’ payment histories and associated credit risks and it does not require collateral from its customers. Certain contracts with advertising agencies contain sequential liability provisions, whereby the agency does not have an obligation to pay the Company until payment is received from the agency’s customers. In these circumstances, the Company evaluates the credit worthiness of the agency’s customers, in addition to the agency itself. As of September 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017, the Company recorded an allowance for doubtful accounts in the amount of $2,511 and $4,028, respectively.

 

From time to time, the Company provides credits to customers and an allowance is made based on historical credit activity. As of September 30, 2018, and December 31, 2017, the Company recorded an allowance for potential customer credits in the amount of $587 and $799, respectively.

 

Goodwill and Long-Lived Asset Impairment Assessments

 

The Company evaluates goodwill for impairment in the fourth quarter of its fiscal year annually, or more frequently if events or changes in circumstances indicate that goodwill may be impaired. For the purposes of impairment testing, the Company has determined that it has one reporting unit. The Company performs its goodwill impairment test using the simplified method, whereby the fair value of this reporting unit is compared to its carrying value. If the fair value of the reporting unit exceeds the carrying value of the net assets assigned to that reporting unit, goodwill is not considered impaired. If the carrying value of the net assets assigned to the reporting unit exceeds the fair value of the reporting unit, the goodwill is considered impaired by an amount equal to that difference. Due to a sustained decline in the market capitalization of the Company's common stock during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018, the Company performed an interim goodwill impairment test. The outcome of this goodwill impairment test resulted in an impairment of goodwill of $14,740, which was recorded in the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of comprehensive loss for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018. Refer to Note 4 for details of the Company's goodwill impairment test.

 

The Company evaluates long-lived assets, excluding goodwill, for potential impairment whenever adverse events or changes in circumstances or business climate indicate that expected undiscounted future cash flows related to such long-lived assets may not be sufficient to support the net book value of such assets. An impairment loss is recognized only if the carrying value of a long-lived asset is not recoverable and exceeds its fair value. The carrying value of a long-lived asset is not recoverable if it exceeds the sum of the undiscounted cash flows expected to result from the use and eventual disposition of the asset. There were no such impairment losses recorded in any of the periods presented.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements Adopted in 2018

 

In May 2014, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606), or Accounting Standards Codification 606 (“ASC 606”), which amended the existing accounting standards for revenue recognition. ASC 606 establishes principles for recognizing revenue upon the transfer of promised goods or services to customers, in an amount that reflects the expected consideration received in exchange for those goods or services. The Company adopted ASC 606 on January 1, 2018 using the modified retrospective approach, which resulted in an adjustment to accumulated deficit for the cumulative effect of applying this standard to contracts in process as of the adoption date. The only material impact on the Company’s condensed consolidated financial statements relates to the deferral of costs to both obtain and fulfill contracts, and the recognition of breakage revenues from its customer advances liability account. See Note 2 for further information on the adoption of ASC 606.

 

In May 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-09, Compensation – Stock Compensation (Topic 718), which clarifies when changes to the terms or conditions of a share-based payment award must be accounted for as a modification. Entities will apply the modification accounting guidance if the value, vesting conditions or classification of the award changes. The Company adopted ASU 2017-09 on January 1, 2018, and it had no impact on the Company’s condensed consolidated financial statements for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018.

 

 

In March 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-05, Income Taxes: Amendments to SEC Paragraphs Pursuant to SEC Staff Accounting Bulletin No. 118 (“SAB 118”) (Topic 740), which includes amendments to expand income tax accounting and disclosure guidance pursuant to SAB 118 issued by the SEC in December 2017. SAB 118 provides guidance on accounting for the income tax effects of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (“TCJA”). See Note 10 for further information and disclosures related to SAB 118.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements Not Yet Effective

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842), which will supersede the current lease guidance under ASC 840 and makes several changes such as requiring an entity to recognize a right-of-use asset and corresponding lease obligation on the balance sheet. ASU 2016-02 also requires enhanced disclosures of key information about leasing arrangements. This new standard is effective for interim and annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2018, and early adoption is permitted. In July 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-10, Codification Improvements to Topic 842, Leases, and ASU 2018-11, Leases (Topic 842): Targeted Improvements, to clarify certain guidance in ASU 2016-02 and provide entities with an optional transition method to adopt the standard by recognizing a cumulative-effect adjustment to the opening balance of retained earnings as of the adoption date. The Company intends to adopt the new standard using the optional cumulative-effect adjustment method under ASU 2018-11 and is currently working through lease contract scoping, design and implementation of transition related controls, as well as the finalization of accounting elections. The Company is still assessing the impact that this standard will have on its consolidated financial statements and related disclosures, but it anticipates that it will result in the Company recording additional right-of-use assets and corresponding liabilities on its consolidated balance sheet.

 

In February 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-02, Income Statement – Reporting Comprehensive Income – Reclassification of Certain Tax Effects from Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Topic 220), which allows for a reclassification from accumulated other comprehensive income to retained earnings for stranded tax effects resulting from the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (see Note 10). ASU 2018-02 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within those fiscal years, and early adoption is permitted. The Company is currently assessing the impact this ASU will have on its consolidated financial statements.

 

In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-13, Fair Value Measurement (Topic 820), which is designed to improve the effectiveness of disclosures related to fair value measurements. ASU 2018-13 is effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2019, including interim periods within those fiscal years, and early adoption is permitted. The Company is currently assessing the impact this ASU will have on its consolidated financial statements.

 

In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-15, Intangibles – Goodwill and Other – Internal-Use Software (Subtopic 35-40), which aligns the requirements for capitalizing implementation costs incurred in a hosting arrangement that is a service contract with the requirements for capitalizing implementation costs incurred to develop or obtain internal-use software. ASU 2018-15 is effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2019, including interim periods within those fiscal years, and early adoption is permitted. The Company is currently assessing the impact this ASU will have on its consolidated financial statements.

 

 

 

2. Revenues

 

Adoption of ASC 606

 

On January 1, 2018, the Company adopted ASC 606 using the modified retrospective method applied to those contracts that were not completed as of that date. Results for reporting periods beginning after January 1, 2018 are presented under ASC 606, while prior period amounts are not adjusted and continue to be reported in accordance with prior revenue recognition accounting guidance.

 

The Company recorded a net reduction to opening accumulated deficit of $4,085, net of tax, as of January 1, 2018 due to the cumulative impact of adopting ASC 606, with the impact primarily related to the recognition of breakage revenues and the deferral of incremental costs to both obtain and fulfill contracts. The impact to revenues for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018 as a result of applying ASC 606 was not material. The adoption of ASC 606 did not have a material impact on the Company’s provision for income taxes, and had no impact on the net cash used in operating, investing and financing activities on the Company’s condensed consolidated statements of cash flows. Refer to “ASC 606 Adoption Impact on Reported Results,” below, for the impact of the adoption of ASC 606 on the Company’s condensed consolidated balance sheets and condensed consolidated statements of operations.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

The Company generates its revenues principally from subscriptions either directly with advertisers or with advertising agencies to its platform for the management of search, social, display and eCommerce advertising. Revenues are recognized when control of these services is transferred to the Company’s customers, in an amount that reflects the consideration the Company expects to be entitled to in exchange for those services.

 

The Company determines revenue recognition through the following steps:

 

 

Identification of the contract, or contracts, with a customer;

 

 

Identification of the performance obligations in the contract;

 

 

Determination of the transaction price;

 

 

Allocation of the transaction price to the performance obligations in the contract; and

 

 

Recognition of revenue when, or as, the Company satisfies a performance obligation.

 

The subscription fee under most contracts is variable based on the value of the advertising spend that the Company’s advertisers manage through the Company’s platform and is generally invoiced and recognized on a monthly basis. Contracts with direct advertisers and certain contracts with independent advertising agencies also include a minimum monthly fee that is recognized over the duration of the contract, commencing on the date that the Company’s platform is made available to the customer.

 

 

Due to the nature of the platform and the services performed under the subscription agreements, the Company determined that the variable and fixed subscription fees should be allocated to the monthly period in which the Company has the contractual right to bill under the contract. As a result, the adoption of ASC 606 did not have a material impact on the Company’s subscription revenues.

 

Disaggregation of Revenues

 

Revenues by geographic area, based on the billing location of the customer, were as follows for the periods presented:

 

   

Three Months Ended September 30,

   

Nine Months Ended September 30,

 
   

2018

   

2017

   

2018

   

2017

 

United States of America

  $ 9,192     $ 11,995     $ 28,987     $ 38,040  

United Kingdom

    1,755       2,358       5,877       7,419  

Other (1)

    2,206       3,871       7,942       11,840  

Total revenues, net

  $ 13,153     $ 18,224     $ 42,806     $ 57,299  

 

(1)

No individual country within the “Other” category accounted for 10% or more of revenues, net for any period presented.

 

Contract Balances

 

Accounts receivable, net

 

The timing of revenue recognition may differ from the timing of invoicing to customers. Accounts receivable are recorded at the invoiced amount, net of any necessary allowance for doubtful accounts or credit reserves. A receivable is recognized in the period the Company provides the underlying services or when the right to consideration is unconditional. The balance of accounts receivable, net of the allowance for doubtful accounts and the credit reserve, as of September 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017 is presented in the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets.

 

 

Customer advances

 

The Company records advances from customers for cash payments that are received in advance of its performance of the underlying services. These cash payments are generally received on a weekly basis at amounts that are at the discretion of the customers, based on established advertising budgets. The unused portion of these advances from customers is included within accruals and other current liabilities on the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets.

 

Under the Company’s terms of service, individual customer advances that are not used by or refunded to the customer for a period of 180 days become the property of the Company. The Company recognizes these advances from customers that have remained outstanding for 180 days or more as breakage revenues. The Company recorded historical breakage up to January 1, 2018 as an adjustment to opening accumulated deficit, and breakage revenue for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018 within revenues, net. Changes in the balance of advances from customers during the nine months ended September 30, 2018 are as follows:

 

Balance at December 31, 2017, as previously reported

  $ 2,003  

Impact of adoption of ASC 606 on January 1, 2018

    (1,445 )

Balance at January 1, 2018, as adjusted

    558  
Customer advances received     5,826  
Subscription revenue recognized (on a gross basis)     (5,781 )
Breakage revenue recognized     (156 )

Balance at September 30, 2018

  $ 447  

 

 

Costs to Obtain and Fulfill Contracts

 

The Company capitalizes certain contract acquisition costs, consisting primarily of commissions paid and the related payroll taxes that are incremental to obtaining customer contracts, when customer contracts are signed (“deferred costs to obtain contracts”).

 

The Company also capitalizes certain contract fulfillment costs, consisting primarily of on-boarding and integration services for new and existing customers performed by the Company’s professional services team. The professional services payroll and the related payroll taxes that are incremental to fulfilling customer contracts are capitalized (“deferred costs to fulfill contracts”).

 

The deferred costs to obtain and fulfill contracts are amortized based on the expected period of benefit, which the Company determined to be three years. This period of benefit was determined by taking into consideration the duration of the Company’s customer contracts, historical contract renewal rates, the underlying technology and other factors. Amortization expense for deferred sales commissions and deferred professional services is included in sales and marketing expense and cost of sales, respectively, on the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of operations.

 

The Company classifies deferred costs to obtain and fulfill contracts as current or non-current based on the timing of when the related amortization expense is expected be recognized. The current portion of these deferred costs is included in prepaid expenses and other current assets, while the non-current portion is included in other non-current assets on the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets. Changes in the balances of deferred costs to obtain and fulfill contracts during the nine months ended September 30, 2018 were as follows:

 

   

Costs to Obtain Contracts

   

Costs to Fulfill Contracts

 

Balances at January 1, 2018, as adjusted for adoption of ASC 606

  $ 1,760     $ 880  
Deferred costs     875       272  
Amortization     (1,152 )     (472 )

Balances at September 30, 2018

  $ 1,483     $ 680  

 

ASC 606 Adoption Impact on Reported Results

 

The following table reflects the accounts impacted by the adoption of ASC 606 on the Company’s condensed consolidated balance sheets at September 30, 2018:

 

   

September 30, 2018

 
   

As Reported

   

Balances Without Adoption of ASC 606

   

Effect of Change Higher/(Lower)

 

Assets

                       
Prepaid expenses and other current assets   $ 4,937     $ 3,679     $ 1,258  
Other non-current assets     2,399       1,494       905  

Liabilities

                       
Accrued expenses and other current liabilities   $ 8,862     $ 10,463     $ (1,601 )

Stockholders' equity

                       
Accumulated deficit   $ (262,351 )   $ (266,115 )   $ 3,764  

 

 

The following tables reflects the impact of the adoption of ASC 606 on the Company’s condensed consolidated statements of operations for the periods presented:

 

   

Three Months Ended September 30,

   

Nine Months Ended September 30,

 
   

As Reported

   

Balances

Without

Adoption of

ASC 606

   

Effect of Change Higher/(Lower)

   

As Reported

   

Balances

Without

Adoption of

ASC 606

   

Effect of Change Higher/(Lower)

 
Revenues, net   $ 13,153     $ 13,119     $ 34     $ 42,806     $ 42,650     $ 156  
Cost of revenues     6,459       6,392       67       20,994       20,794       200  
Gross profit     6,694       6,727       (33 )     21,812       21,856       (44 )

Operating expenses

                                               
Sales and marketing     5,296       5,242       54       18,831       18,554       277  
Research and development     5,471       5,471             17,443       17,443        
General and administrative     2,921       2,921             10,064       10,064        
Impairment of goodwill     14,740       14,740             14,740       14,740        
Total operating expenses     28,428       28,374       54       61,078       60,801       277  
Loss from operations     (21,734 )     (21,647 )     (87 )     (39,266 )     (38,945 )     (321 )
Other income, net     336       336             1,008       1,008        
Loss before provision for income taxes     (21,398 )     (21,311 )     (87 )     (38,258 )     (37,937 )     (321 )
Provision for income taxes     (96 )     (96 )           (624 )     (624 )      
Net loss   $ (21,494 )   $ (21,407 )   $ (87 )   $ (38,882 )   $ (38,561 )   $ (321 )
Net loss per share available to common stockholders, basic and diluted   $ (3.71 )   $ (3.70 )   $ (0.01 )   $ (6.75 )   $ (6.69 )   $ (0.06 )

 

Practical Expedients and Exemptions

 

The Company does not disclose the value of unsatisfied performance obligations since its contracts generally have an original expected term of one year or less and the Company recognizes revenues at the amount to which it has the right to invoice for services performed.

 

 

 

3. Balance Sheet Components

 

The following table shows the components of property and equipment as of the dates presented:

 

     

September 30,

   

December 31,

 
 

Estimated Useful Life

 

2018

   

2017

 
Computer equipment 3 to 4 years   $ 29,190     $ 29,938  

Software, including internally developed software

3 years

    25,083       23,389  
Leasehold improvements Shorter of useful life or lease term     4,778       4,617  
Office equipment, furniture and fixtures 3 to 5 years     2,136       2,127  
Total property and equipment       61,187       60,071  
Less: Accumulated depreciation and amortization       (48,445 )     (44,512 )
Property and equipment, net     $ 12,742     $ 15,559  

 

Depreciation and amortization of internally developed software for the nine months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017 was $5,056 and $6,419, respectively.

 

The following table shows the components of accrued expenses and other current liabilities as of the dates presented:

 

   

September 30,

   

December 31,

 
   

2018

   

2017

 
Accrued salary and payroll-related expenses   $ 3,952     $ 4,372  
Accrued liabilities     1,477       2,161  
Advanced billings     469       459  
Deferred rent     518       475  
Customer advances     447       2,003  
Income taxes payable     840       142  
Sales and use tax payable     203       341  
Other     956       521  
Total accrued expenses and other current liabilities   $ 8,862     $ 10,474  

 

 

 

4. Goodwill and Intangible Assets

 

Due to a continued stock price decline, the Company’s market capitalization decreased to a value below the net book value of the Company’s net assets for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018, triggering the Company to perform an interim goodwill impairment test at that time. For the purposes of this goodwill impairment test, the Company estimated the fair value of its sole reporting unit using the market approach. Under the market approach, the Company utilized the average market capitalization of its fully diluted common stock during the three months ended September 30, 2018, and applied an estimated control premium based on an analysis of control premiums paid in recent acquisitions of companies in the same or similar industries as the Company. Because the significant inputs used in this analysis are readily available from public markets or can be derived from observable market transactions, they have been classified as level 2 within the fair value hierarchy. Based on this analysis, the Company determined that the carrying value of its sole reporting unit exceeded its fair value by $14,740, which has been recorded as an impairment of goodwill in the condensed consolidated statements of comprehensive loss for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018.

 

The goodwill activity for the nine months ended September 30, 2018 consisted of the following:

 

Balance at December 31, 2017

  $ 16,768  
Impairment     (14,740 )

Foreign currency translation adjustments

    (60 )

Balance at September 30, 2018

  $ 1,968  

 

Intangible assets consisted of the following as of the dates presented:

 

     

September 30,

   

December 31,

 
 

Estimated Useful Life

 

2018

   

2017

 

Developed technology

5 to 6 years

  $ 9,910     $ 9,910  

Customer relationships

4 years

    2,080       3,370  

Tradename

3 years

          260  

Total intangible assets

      11,990       13,540  
Less: accumulated amortization       (9,454 )     (9,065 )
Intangible assets, net     $ 2,536     $ 4,475  

 

Amortization of intangible assets was $598 and $700 for the three months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017, respectively, and $1,939 and $2,151 for the nine months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

 

Future estimated amortization of intangible assets as of September 30, 2018, is presented below:

 

Remaining three months of 2018   $ 598  
Year ending December 31, 2019     1,843  
Year ending December 31, 2020     95  
Total   $ 2,536  

 

 

 

5. Restructuring Activities

 

On January 24, 2018, the Company initiated an organizational restructuring plan (the “2018 Restructuring Plan”) designed to reduce operating expenses in response to declines in revenues and to better align the Company’s efforts to return to growth. The 2018 Restructuring Plan included a headcount reduction of approximately 12% of the Company’s workforce, the closure of certain leased facilities and the consolidation of space in the Company’s San Francisco headquarters. Actions pursuant to the 2018 Restructuring Plan were substantially completed as of September 30, 2018, and further associated costs are not expected to be material in future periods. The Company initiated certain other organizational restructuring plans during 2018 which also aimed to reduce operating expenses and primarily consisted of headcount reductions. For the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018, the Company recorded $161 and $1,107, respectively, of restructuring related expenses in connection with the 2018 Restructuring Plan, as well as other organizational restructuring plans, in the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of operations. As of September 30, 2018, approximately $26 in restructuring related expenses associated with the 2018 Restructuring Plan remained unpaid and were included in accrued expenses and other current liabilities on the Company's condensed consolidated balance sheets.

 

 

 

6. Capital Lease Obligations

 

Since 2015, the Company has entered into various capital lease arrangements with two equipment manufacturers to finance acquisitions of computer equipment. These leases have effective annual interest rates ranging from 5.2% to 7.9%, and are repayable in 36 to 48 consecutive equal monthly installments of principal and interest. At the end of each lease period, the Company has the option to purchase the underlying equipment at the estimated fair market value, or for a nominal amount in some cases. As of September 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017, the net book value of the computer equipment under these capital leases was $2,136 and $2,861, respectively, and the remaining principal balance payable was $2,133 and $3,103, respectively.

 

The maturities of all outstanding capital lease arrangements as of September 30, 2018, are as follows:

 

Year ending

       
December 31, 2018   $ 446  
December 31, 2019     1,137  
December 31, 2020     538  
December 31, 2021     12  
Total capital lease obligations     2,133  

Less:

       
Current portion     (1,392 )
Non-current portion of capital lease obligations   $ 741  

 

 

7. Common Stock

 

As of September 30, 2018, and December 31, 2017, the Company’s amended certificate of incorporation authorizes the issuance of 142,857 shares of $0.001 par value common stock. Reserved shares of common stock are as follows:

 

   

September 30,

   

December 31,

 
   

2018

   

2017

 
Options or RSUs available for future grant under stock option plans     771       999  
RSUs outstanding under stock option plans     977       568  
Options outstanding under stock option plans     512       436  
Shares available for future issuance under employee stock purchase plan     208       182  
Total     2,468       2,185  

 

 

 

8. Equity Award Plans

 

In April 2006, the Company’s Board of Directors (the “Board”) adopted and the stockholders approved the 2006 Stock Option Plan (“2006 Plan”), which provided for the grant of incentive and non-statutory stock options. In February 2013 the Board adopted and the stockholders approved the 2013 Equity Incentive Plan (“2013 Plan”), which became effective on March 21, 2013. At that time, the Company ceased to grant equity awards under the 2006 Plan. Under the 2013 Plan, 643 shares of common stock were originally reserved for issuance. Additionally, all reserved and unissued shares under the 2006 Plan are eligible for issuance under the 2013 Plan. The 2013 Plan authorizes the award of incentive and non-statutory stock options, restricted stock awards, stock appreciation rights, RSUs, performance awards and stock bonuses to the Company’s employees, directors, consultants, independent contractors and advisors. On January 1 of each of the first 10 calendar years through 2023, the number of shares of common stock reserved under the 2013 Plan will automatically increase by an amount equal to 5% of the total outstanding shares as of immediately preceding December 31, or such lesser number of shares as determined by the Board. Pursuant to terms of the 2013 Plan, the shares available for issuance increased by 286 shares of common stock on January 1, 2018.

 

Stock Options

 

A summary of stock option activity under the 2006 Plan and 2013 Plan is as follows:

 

   

Options Outstanding

 
   

Number of Shares

   

Weighted Average Exercise Price Per Share

   

Weighted Average Remaining Contractual Term (in Years)

   

Aggregate Intrinsic Value

 

Balances at December 31, 2017

    436     $ 37.60       7.04     $ 65  
Options granted     122       7.06       9.48          
Options forfeited and cancelled     (46 )     37.89                
Balances at September 30, 2018     512       30.25       6.06        
Options exercisable     359       38.66       4.80        
Options vested     359       38.65       4.80        
Options vested and expected to vest     495       30.90       5.96        

 

RSUs

 

A summary of RSUs granted and unvested under the 2013 Plan is as follows:

 

   

RSUs Outstanding

 
   

Number of Shares

   

Weighted Average

Grant Date Fair

Value Per Unit

 

Granted and unvested at December 31, 2017

    568     $ 14.22  

RSUs granted

    644       6.70  

RSUs vested

    (30 )     23.06  

RSUs cancelled and withheld to cover taxes

    (205 )     13.39  

Granted and unvested at September 30, 2018

    977     $ 9.16  

 

Employee Stock Purchase Plan

 

In February 2013, the Board and stockholders approved the 2013 Employee Stock Purchase Plan (“2013 ESPP”), under which 143 shares of common stock were originally reserved for issuance. The 2013 ESPP became effective on March 22, 2013. The 2013 ESPP provides generally for six-month purchase periods and the purchase price for shares of common stock purchased under the 2013 ESPP is 85% of the lesser of the fair market value of the common stock on (1) the first trading day of the applicable offering period and (2) the last trading day of each purchase period in the applicable offering period. On January 1 of each of the first 10 calendar years following the first offering date, the number of shares reserved under the 2013 ESPP automatically increases by an amount equal to 1% of the total outstanding shares as of immediately preceding December 31, but not to exceed 100 shares. Pursuant to terms of the 2013 ESPP, the shares available for issuance increased by 57 shares on January 1, 2018. During both the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018, 31 shares were issued under the 2013 ESPP. During both the three and nine months ended September 30, 2017, 15 shares were issued under the 2013 ESPP.

 

 

 

9. Stock-Based Compensation

 

For stock-based awards granted by the Company, stock-based compensation expense is measured at grant date based on the fair value of the award and is expensed over the requisite service period. The Company recorded stock-based compensation expense of $875 and $923 for the three months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017, respectively, and $2,933 and $3,683 for the nine months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

 

 

Stock Options

 

The Company uses the Black-Scholes option-pricing model to estimate the fair value of options. This model requires the input of highly subjective assumptions including the expected volatility, risk-free interest rate and the expected life of options. The Company used the following assumptions for its Black-Scholes option-pricing model for the periods presented (there were no stock options granted during the three months ended September 30, 2018):

 

   

Three Months Ended September 30,

   

Nine Months Ended September 30,

 
   

2018

   

2017

   

2018

   

2017

 

Dividend yield

                       

Expected volatility

          46.9 %     55.9 %     47.3 %

Risk-free interest rate

          1.94 %     2.54 %     2.03 %

Expected life of options (in years)

          6.25       4.00       6.25  

 

During the nine months ended September 30, 2018, the Company began estimating the expected volatility of its common stock and expected life of its stock options based on its own historical experience. The expected volatility reflects the actual historical volatility of the price of the Company’s common stock since it began trading publicly in March 2013. The expected life represents the period of time that stock options are expected to be outstanding, based on historical exercise and employee departure behavior. Prior to 2018, the Company estimated its expected volatility using the historical stock volatilities of similar publicly-traded companies, and estimated the expected life based on the simplified method as allowed by the SEC staff. The Company has no history or expectation of paying cash dividends on its common stock. The risk-free interest rate is based on the U.S. Treasury yield for a term consistent with the expected life of the options in effect at the time of grant.

 

There were no exercises of stock options during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017.

 

Compensation expense, net of estimated forfeitures, is recognized ratably over the requisite service period. As of September 30, 2018, there was $614 of unrecognized compensation cost related to stock options, which is expected to be recognized over a weighted-average period of 1.9 years.

 

RSUs

 

As of September 30, 2018, there was $5,957 of unrecognized compensation cost related to RSUs, which is expected to be recognized over a weighted-average period of 2.5 years. The Company uses the fair market value of the underlying common stock on the dates of grant to determine the fair value of RSUs. Stock-based compensation expense related to these awards is recognized on a straight-line basis over the service period of the award for the estimated number of shares that are ultimately expected to vest.

 

Employee Stock Purchase Plan

 

The Company estimates the fair value of purchase rights under the 2013 ESPP using the Black-Scholes valuation model. The fair value of each purchase right under the 2013 ESPP was estimated on the date of grant using the Black-Scholes option valuation model and the straight-line attribution approach with assumptions substantially similar to those used for the valuation of our stock option awards.

 

 

 

10. Income Taxes

 

The Company’s quarterly provision for income taxes is based on an estimated effective annual income tax rate. The Company’s quarterly provision for income taxes also includes the tax impact of certain unusual or infrequently occurring items, if any, including changes in judgment about valuation allowances and effects of changes in tax laws or rates, in the interim period in which they occur.

 

Income tax expense for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018 was $96 and $624, respectively, on pre-tax losses of $21,398 and $38,258, respectively. As of September 30, 2018, the income tax rate varies from the federal income tax rate primarily due to valuation allowances in the United States and taxable income generated by the Company’s foreign wholly owned subsidiaries.

 

The Company reviews the likelihood that it will realize the benefit of its deferred tax assets and, therefore, the need for valuation allowances on a quarterly basis. There is no income tax benefit recognized with respect to losses incurred and no income tax expense recognized with respect to earnings generated in jurisdictions with a valuation allowance. This causes variability in the Company’s effective tax rate. The Company will maintain the valuation allowances until it is more likely than not that the net deferred tax assets will be realized.

 

Tax positions taken by the Company are subject to audits by multiple tax jurisdictions. The Company accounts for uncertain tax positions and believes that it has provided adequate reserves for its unrecognized tax benefits for all tax years still open for assessment. The Company also believes that it does not have any tax position for which it is not reasonably possible that the total amounts of uncertain tax positions will significantly increase or decrease within the next year. For the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017, the Company did not recognize any interest or penalties related to uncertain tax positions.

 

 

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act

 

On December 22, 2017, the United States enacted the TCJA, which instituted fundamental changes to the taxation of multinational corporations, including, but not limited to: (1) a reduction of the U.S. federal corporate income tax rate from 35% to 21% for tax years beginning after December 31, 2017; (2) the creation of new minimum taxes such as the base erosion anti-abuse tax (“BEAT”) and Global Intangible Low Taxed Income (“GILTI”) tax and (3) the transition of international taxation from a worldwide tax system to a modified territorial system, which will result in a one time U.S. tax liability on those earnings which have not previously been repatriated to the U.S. (“Transition Tax”).

 

As a result of the reduced corporate income tax rate, the Company re-measured its deferred tax assets and liabilities and reduced them by $18,696 and $4,394, respectively, with a corresponding net adjustment to the valuation allowance of $14,302 for the year ended December 31, 2017.

 

The BEAT provisions in the TCJA essentially represent a 10% minimum tax (5% for tax years beginning after December 31, 2017, increasing to 10% for years beginning after December 31, 2018) calculated on a base equal to taxpayer’s income determined without tax benefits arising from base erosion payments. BEAT does not apply to corporations with annual gross receipts for the three-taxable-year period, ending with the preceding taxable year, of less than $500,000. As a result, BEAT does not apply to the Company for the year ending December 31, 2018.

 

In addition, the TCJA imposes a U.S. tax on GILTI that is earned by certain foreign subsidiaries. Due to the complexity of the GILTI tax rules, the Company’s accounting for GILTI is incomplete. The Company has not made any provisional adjustment related to potential GILTI tax on its condensed consolidated financial statements, and has not yet made a policy decision regarding whether to record GILTI as a component of the current period income tax provision or in the measurement of deferred taxes.

 

The Transition Tax is imposed on previously untaxed historical earnings and profits of foreign subsidiaries. Based on an evaluation of the Company’s operations, no repatriation tax charge was assessed on its U.S. income tax return for the year ended December 31, 2017 due to negative earnings and profits in the Company’s foreign subsidiaries.

 

The SEC staff issued SAB 118 to address the application of GAAP in situations when a registrant does not have the necessary information available, prepared or analyzed (including computations) in reasonable detail to complete the accounting for certain income tax effects of the TCJA. For the three months ended September 30, 2018, the accounting for the TCJA remained incomplete, but there were no material changes to the provisional tax impacts assessed for the year ended December 31, 2017. The Company is continuing to gather additional information to complete its accounting for the tax effects of the TCJA and expects to complete such accounting within the prescribed measurement period of up to one year from the enactment of the TCJA.

 

 

 

11. Net Loss Per Share Available to Common Stockholders

 

Basic net loss of common stock is calculated by dividing the net loss available to common stockholders by the weighted-average number of shares of common stock outstanding for the period. The weighted-average number of shares of common stock excludes those shares subject to repurchase related to stock options or restricted stock that were exercised or issued, respectively, prior to vesting, as these shares are not deemed to be outstanding for accounting purposes until they vest. Diluted net loss per share of common stock is computed by dividing the net loss using the weighted-average number of shares of common stock, excluding common stock subject to repurchase, and, if dilutive, potential shares of common stock outstanding during the period. Basic and diluted net loss per share was the same for all periods presented, as the impact of all potentially dilutive securities outstanding was anti-dilutive.

 

 

The following table presents the calculation of basic and diluted net loss per share:

 

   

Three Months Ended September 30,

   

Nine Months Ended September 30,

 
   

2018

   

2017

   

2018

   

2017

 

Numerator:

                               
Net loss available to common stockholders   $ (21,494 )   $ (7,549 )   $ (38,882 )   $ (24,220 )

Denominator:

                               
Weighted average number of shares, basic and diluted     5,787       5,651       5,763       5,625  

Net loss per share available to common stockholders

                               
Basic and diluted net loss per common share available to common stockholders   $ (3.71 )   $ (1.34 )   $ (6.75 )   $ (4.31 )

 

The following table presents the potential shares of common stock outstanding that were excluded from the computation of diluted net loss per share available to common stockholders for the periods presented because including them would have been anti-dilutive:

 

   

Three and Nine Months Ended September 30,

 
   

2018

   

2017

 
Options to purchase common stock     512       438  
Unvested RSUs     977       373  
Total     1,489       811  

 

 

12. Segment Reporting

 

The Company defines the term “chief operating decision maker” to be the Chief Executive Officer. The Chief Executive Officer reviews the financial information presented on a consolidated basis for purposes of allocating resources and evaluating of financial performance. Accordingly, the Company has determined that it operates as a single reportable and operating segment.

 

See Note 2 for the Company’s revenues by geographic area, based on the billing location of the customer, for the periods presented. Long-lived assets, excluding goodwill and intangible assets, by geographic area were as follows for the periods presented:

 

   

September 30,

   

December 31,

 
   

2018

   

2017

 

United States of America

  $ 12,378     $ 15,069  

International

    364       490  

Total long-lived assets, net

  $ 12,742     $ 15,559  

 

 

13. Commitments and Contingencies

 

Operating Leases and Subleases

 

Rent expense for the three months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017 was $2,089 and $2,145, respectively, and for the nine months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017 was $6,284 and $6,413, respectively.

 

In August 2018, the Company entered into agreements to (a) extend its existing sublease for a portion of its San Francisco office space through July 2022, and (b) sublease an additional 14,380 square feet of its San Francisco office space to an unrelated third party through July 2020, with a subtenant option to extend the sublease through July 2022. The Company also maintains a sublease agreement with an unrelated third party for a portion of its Portland office space (through May 2020). Income from these sublease agreements is included in other income (expenses) on the condensed consolidated statements of comprehensive loss. Sublease income for the three months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017 was $366 and $277, respectively, and for the nine months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017 was $920 and $819, respectively.

 

Future minimum lease payments for significant operating leases as of September 30, 2018, were as follows:

 

Remaining three months of 2018   $ 2,157  
Year ending December 31, 2019     8,255  
Year ending December 31, 2020     3,697  
Year ending December 31, 2021     3,432  
Year ending December 31, 2022 and thereafter     2,658  
Total   $ 20,199  

 

Total future minimum lease payments have not been reduced by future minimum sublease rental income totaling $6,196.

 

 

Legal Matters

 

From time to time, the Company may be involved in lawsuits, claims, investigations and proceedings, consisting of intellectual property, commercial, employment and other matters, which arise in the ordinary course of business. In accordance with GAAP, the Company records a liability when it is both probable that a liability has been incurred and the amount of the loss can be reasonably estimated. These provisions are reviewed at least quarterly and adjusted to reflect the impact of negotiations, settlements, ruling, advice of legal counsel and other information and events pertaining to a particular case. Litigation is inherently unpredictable. If any unfavorable ruling was to occur in any specific period or if a loss becomes probable and estimable, there exists the possibility of a material adverse impact on the Company’s results of operations, financial position or cash flows.

 

Indemnification

 

The Company enters into standard indemnification agreements in the ordinary course of business. Pursuant to the agreements, each party may indemnify, defend and hold the other party harmless with respect to such claim, suit or proceeding brought against it by a third party alleging that the indemnifying party’s intellectual property infringes upon the intellectual property of the third party, or results from a breach of the indemnifying party’s representations and warranties or covenants, or that results from any acts of negligence or willful misconduct. The term of these indemnification agreements is generally perpetual any time after execution of the agreement. The maximum potential amount of future payments the Company could be required to make under these indemnification agreements is unlimited. Historically, the Company has not been obligated to make significant payments for these obligations and no liabilities have been recorded for these obligations on the unaudited consolidated condensed balance sheet as of September 30, 2018 and audited consolidated balance sheet as of December 31, 2017.

 

The Company also indemnifies its officers and directors for certain events or occurrences, subject to certain limits, while the officer or director is or was serving at the Company’s request in such capacity. The maximum amount of potential future indemnification is unlimited; however, the Company has a directors and officers insurance policy that limits its exposure and enables the Company to recover a portion of any future amounts paid. Historically, the Company has not been obligated to make any payments for these obligations and no liabilities have been recorded for these obligations as of September 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017.

 

Other Contingencies

 

The Company is subject to claims and assessments from time to time in the ordinary course of business. The Company’s management does not believe that any such matters, individually or in the aggregate, will have a material adverse effect on the Company’s financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

 

 

 

Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

 

The following discussion and analysis of our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows should be read in conjunction with the (1) unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements and the related notes thereto included elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended September 30, 2018, and (2) the audited consolidated financial statements and notes thereto and management’s discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operations for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2017, included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K, as amended, for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2017, filed with the SEC on March 5, 2018. This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q contains “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the “Exchange Act.” These statements are often identified by the use of words such as “believe,” “may,” “potentially,” “will,” “estimate,” “continue,” “anticipate,” “intend,” “could,” “should,” “would,” “project,” “plan,” “predict,” “expect,” “seek” and similar expressions or variations. Such forward-looking statements are subject to risks, uncertainties and other factors that could cause actual results and the timing of certain events to differ materially from future results expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Factors that could cause or contribute to such differences include, but are not limited to, those identified herein, and those discussed in the section titled “Risk Factors”, set forth in Part II, Item 1A of this Form 10-Q. Except as required by law, we disclaim any obligation to update any forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances after the date of such statements.

 

Overview

 

We provide a leading cross-channel, cross-device, enterprise marketing software platform for search, social, display and eCommerce advertising channels, offered as a software-as-a-service, or SaaS, solution for advertisers and agencies. Our platform is an analytics, workflow and optimization solution for marketing professionals, allowing them to effectively manage their digital advertising spend across search, social and display channels. We market and sell our solutions to advertisers directly and through leading advertising agencies, and our customers collectively manage billions of dollars in advertising spend on our platform globally across a wide range of industries. Our solution is designed to help our customers:

 

 

measure the effectiveness of their advertising campaigns through our proprietary reporting and analytics capabilities;

 

 

manage and execute campaigns through our intuitive user interface and underlying technology that streamlines and automates key functions, such as advertisement creation and bidding, across multiple publishers and channels; and

 

 

optimize campaigns across multiple publishers and channels based on market and business data to achieve desired revenue outcomes using our predictive bid management technology.

 

Components of Results of Operations

 

Revenues

 

We generate revenues principally from subscription contracts under which we provide advertisers with access to our search, social, display and eCommerce advertising management platform, either directly or through the advertiser’s relationship with an agency with whom we have a contract. Under these subscription contracts, we charge fees generally based upon the amount of advertising spend that our customers manage through our platform.

 

Under our subscription contracts with most direct advertisers and some of our independent agency customers, customers contractually commit to a minimum monthly platform fee, which is generally greater than one-half of our estimated monthly revenues from these customers, at the time the contract is signed. Under most of our contracts with advertising agencies, the advertiser is not a party to the terms of the contract. Accordingly, most advertisers operating through network agencies do not have a minimum commitment to use our services, and the advertisers may be added or removed from our platform at the discretion of the respective network agency. Historically, our revenues earned from advertising agency customers have ranged between approximately one-third and one-half of our overall revenues.

 

We generally begin invoicing our customers the first day of the month following the execution of the underlying subscription contract, at the greater of the minimum monthly platform fee or the percentage of advertising spend on our platform. The implementation process for new advertisers is typically four to six weeks; however, we generally have not charged a separate implementation fee under our standard subscription contracts.

 

To grow revenues, we may need to invest in (1) research and development to improve and further expand our platform and support for additional publishers and (2) sales activities by adding sales representatives globally to target new advertisers and agencies. These activities will require us to make investments, particularly in research and development and sales and marketing, and if these investments do not generate additional customers or additional advertising spend managed by our platform, our future operating results could be harmed.

 

19

 

The majority of our revenues are derived from advertisers based in the United States. Advertisers from outside the United States represented 30% and 34% of total revenues for the three months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017, respectively, and 32% and 34% of total revenues for the nine months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

 

Effective January 1, 2018, we adopted Accounting Standards Update 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606), or Accounting Standards Codification 606 (“ASC 606”), using the modified retrospective approach. See Note 2 of the accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements for further details regarding this adoption.

 

Cost of Revenues

 

Cost of revenues primarily includes personnel costs, consisting of salaries, benefits, bonuses and stock-based compensation for employees associated with our cloud infrastructure and global services for implementation and ongoing customer service. Certain personnel costs associated with implementation activities are deferred and amortized over an expected period of benefit of three years in accordance with ASC 606 (see Note 2 of the accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements for further details). Other costs of revenues include fees paid to contractors who supplement our support and data center personnel, expenses related to third-party data centers, depreciation of data center equipment, amortization of internally developed software, amortization of intangible assets and allocated overhead.

 

We are reducing our headcount and operating expenses to bring them in line with our revenues, while continuing to maintain our data center capacity and add new platform features.

 

Sales and Marketing Expenses

 

Sales and marketing expenses include personnel costs, sales commissions and other costs including travel and entertainment, marketing and promotional events, lead generation activities, public relations, marketing activities, professional fees and allocated overhead. All of these costs are expensed as incurred, except sales commissions, which are deferred and amortized over an expected period of benefit of three years in accordance with ASC 606 (see Note 2 of the accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements for further details). Our commissions plans provide that commission payments to our sales representatives are paid based on the key components of the applicable customer contract.

 

We expect that, in the future, sales and marketing expenses will decrease year over year in absolute dollars as we seek to realign our cost structure with future revenues.

 

Research and Development Expenses

 

Research and development expenses consist primarily of personnel costs for our product development and engineering employees and executives, including salaries, benefits, stock-based compensation expense and bonuses. Also included are non-personnel costs such as professional fees payable to third-party development resources, amortization of intangible assets and allocated overhead.

 

Our research and development efforts are focused on enhancing our software architecture, adding new features and functionality to our platform and improving the efficiency with which we deliver these services to our customers. We expect that research and development expenses may decrease in absolute dollars as we seek to realign our cost structure with our future revenues.

 

General and Administrative Expenses

 

General and administrative expenses consist primarily of personnel costs, including salaries, benefits, stock-based compensation and bonuses for our administrative, legal, human resources, finance and accounting employees and executives. Also included are non-personnel costs, such as travel-related expenses, audit fees, tax services and legal fees, as well as professional fees, insurance and other corporate expenses and other corporate expenses, along with amortization of intangible assets and allocated overhead.

 

We expect our general and administrative expenses to decrease in absolute dollars in future periods as we seek to realign our cost structure with our future revenues.

 

20

 

Results of Operations

 

The following table is a summary of our unaudited condensed consolidated statements of operations for the specified periods and results of operations as a percentage of our revenues for those periods. The period-to-period comparisons of results are not necessarily indicative of results for future periods. Percentage of revenues figures are rounded and therefore may not subtotal exactly.

 

   

Three Months Ended September 30,

   

Nine Months Ended September 30,

 
   

2018

   

2017

   

2018

   

2017

 
   

Amount

   

% of

Revenues

   

Amount

   

% of

Revenues

   

Amount

   

% of

Revenues

   

Amount

   

% of

Revenues

 
   

(dollars in thousands)

 
Revenues, net   $ 13,153       100 %   $ 18,224       100 %   $ 42,806       100 %   $ 57,299       100 %
Cost of revenues (1) (2) (3)     6,459       49       8,256       45       20,994       49       24,787       43  
Gross profit     6,694       51       9,968       55       21,812       51       32,512       57  

Operating expenses

                                                               
Sales and marketing (1) (2) (3)     5,296       40       6,630       36       18,831       44       20,016       35  
Research and development (1) (2) (3)     5,471       42       6,672       37       17,443       41       20,456       36  
General and administrative (1) (2) (3)     2,921       22       3,920       22       10,064       24       12,042       21  
Impairment of goodwill     14,740       112                   14,740       34       2,797       5  
Total operating expenses     28,428       216       17,222       95       61,078       143       55,311       97  
Loss from operations     (21,734 )     (165 )     (7,254 )     (40 )     (39,266 )     (92 )     (22,799 )     (40 )
Other income (expenses), net     336       3       (144 )     (1 )     1,008       2       (445 )     (1 )
Loss before provision for income taxes     (21,398 )     (163 )     (7,398 )     (41 )     (38,258 )     (89 )     (23,244 )     (41 )
Provision for income taxes     (96 )     (1 )     (151 )     (1 )     (624 )     (1 )     (976 )     (2 )
Net loss   $ (21,494 )     (163 )%   $ (7,549 )     (41 )%   $ (38,882 )     (91 )%   $ (24,220 )     (42 )%

 

(1)

Stock-based compensation expense included in the unaudited condensed consolidated statements of operations data above was as follows:

 

   

Three Months Ended September 30,

   

Nine Months Ended September 30,

 
   

2018

   

2017

   

2018

   

2017

 
   

(in thousands)

 
Cost of revenues   $ 160     $ 166     $ 536     $ 629  
Sales and marketing     181       197       692       609  
Research and development     339       326       992       1,640  
General and administrative     195       234       713       805  

 

(2)

Amortization of intangible assets included in the unaudited condensed consolidated statements of operations data above was as follows:

 

   

Three Months Ended September 30,

   

Nine Months Ended September 30,

 
   

2018

   

2017

   

2018

   

2017

 
   

(in thousands)

 
Cost of revenues   $ 234     $ 240     $ 704     $ 732  
Sales and marketing     130       216       527       661  
Research and development     234       239       705       730  

General and administrative

          5       3       28  

 

21

 

(3)

Restructuring related expenses included in the unaudited condensed consolidated statements of operations data above was as follows:

 

   

Three Months Ended September 30,

   

Nine Months Ended September 30,

 
   

2018

   

2017

   

2018

   

2017

 
   

(in thousands)

 
Cost of revenues   $ 37     $     $ 176     $  
Sales and marketing     113             658        

Research and development

                115        
General and administrative     11             158        

 

Adjusted EBITDA

 

Adjusted EBITDA is a financial measure not calculated in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States (“GAAP”). We define Adjusted EBITDA as net loss, adjusted for stock-based compensation expense, depreciation, the amortization of internally developed software, intangible assets and deferred costs to obtain and fulfill contracts, the capitalization of internally developed software, the deferral of costs to obtain and fulfill contracts, the impairment of goodwill and long-lived assets, interest expense, net, the provision for income taxes, other income or expenses, net and the non-recurring costs associated with acquisitions and restructurings. Adjusted EBITDA should not be considered as an alternative to net loss, operating loss or any other measure of financial performance calculated and presented in accordance with GAAP. We prepare Adjusted EBITDA to eliminate the impact of items that we do not consider indicative of our core operating performance. Investors are encouraged to evaluate these adjustments and the reasons we consider them appropriate.

 

We believe Adjusted EBITDA is useful to investors in evaluating our operating performance for the following reasons:

 

 

Adjusted EBITDA is widely used by investors and securities analysts to measure a company’s operating performance without regard to items, such as stock-based compensation expense, depreciation and amortization, capitalized software development costs, deferred costs associated with contracts, interest expense, net, benefit from or provision for income taxes, other income or expenses, net and costs associated with acquisitions and restructurings, that can vary substantially from company to company depending upon their financing, capital structures and the method by which assets were acquired;

 

 

Our management uses Adjusted EBITDA in conjunction with GAAP financial measures for bonus compensation and planning purposes, including the preparation of our annual operating budget, as a measure of operating performance and the effectiveness of our business strategies and in communications with our Board concerning our financial performance; and

 

 

Adjusted EBITDA provides consistency and comparability with our past financial performance, facilitates period-to-period comparisons of operations and also facilitates comparisons with other peer companies, many of which use similar non-GAAP financial measures to supplement their GAAP results.

 

We understand that, although Adjusted EBITDA is widely used by investors and securities analysts in their evaluations of companies, it has limitations as an analytical tool, and investors should not consider it in isolation or as a substitute for analysis of our results of operations as reported under GAAP. These limitations include:

 

 

Depreciation and amortization are non-cash charges, and the assets being depreciated or amortized will often have to be replaced in the future; Adjusted EBITDA does not reflect any cash requirements for these replacements;

 

 

Adjusted EBITDA does not reflect changes in, or cash requirements for, our working capital needs or contractual commitments;

 

 

Adjusted EBITDA does not reflect cash requirements for income taxes and the cash impact of other income or expense; and

 

 

Other companies may calculate Adjusted EBITDA differently than we do, limiting its usefulness as a comparative measure.

 

22

 

The following table presents a reconciliation of net loss, the most comparable GAAP measure, to Adjusted EBITDA for each of the periods indicated:

 

   

Three Months Ended September 30,

   

Nine Months Ended September 30,

 
   

2018

   

2017

   

2018

   

2017

 
   

(in thousands)

 
Net loss   $ (21,494 )   $ (7,549 )   $ (38,882 )   $ (24,220 )
Depreciation     628       1,149       2,185       3,748  

Amortization of internally developed software

    928       1,016       2,871       2,671  
Amortization of intangible assets     598       700       1,939       2,151  
Amortization of deferred costs to obtain and fulfill contracts     479             1,624        
Provision for income taxes     96       151       624       976  

Impairment of goodwill

    14,740             14,740       2,797  
Stock-based compensation expense     875       923       2,933       3,683  

Capitalization of internally developed software costs

    (398 )     (442 )     (1,693 )     (1,398 )

Deferral of costs to obtain and fulfill contracts

    (359 )           (1,147 )      
Restructuring related expenses     161             1,107        
Other (income) expenses, net     (336 )     144       (1,008 )     445  
Adjusted EBITDA   $ (4,082 )   $ (3,908 )   $ (14,707 )   $ (9,147 )

 

Comparison of the Three and Nine Months Ended September 30, 2018 and 2017

 

Revenues, net

 

   

Three Months Ended

September 30,

   

Change

   

Nine Months Ended

September 30,

   

Change

 
   

2018

   

2017

   

$

   

%

   

2018

   

2017

   

$

   

%

 
   

(dollars in thousands)

 
Revenues, net   $ 13,153     $ 18,224     $ (5,071 )     (28 )%   $ 42,806     $ 57,299     $ (14,493 )     (25 )%

 

Revenues, net, for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018 decreased $5.1 million and $14.5 million, respectively, or 28% and 25%, respectively, as compared to the corresponding periods in 2017. During the preceding 12 months, we experienced ongoing customer turnover, which was not fully offset by new customer bookings. In addition, we continued to encounter significant competition and related price pressure within our marketplace, further driving down our revenues, net.

 

Revenues, net, for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018, from our customers located in the United States represented 70% and 68%, respectively, of total revenues, net, and in the three and nine months ended September 30, 2017, revenues, net, from our customers located in the United States represented 66% (for both periods) of total revenues, net. There were no customers that accounted for 10% or greater of our revenues, net, in either of the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018 or 2017.

 

Cost of Revenues and Gross Margin

 

   

Three Months Ended

September 30,

   

Change

   

Nine Months Ended

September 30,

   

Change

 
   

2018

   

2017

   

$

   

%

   

2018

   

2017

   

$

   

%

 
   

(dollars in thousands)

 
Cost of revenues   $ 6,459     $ 8,256     $ (1,797 )     (22 )%   $ 20,994     $ 24,787     $ (3,793 )     (15 )%
Gross profit     6,694       9,968       (3,274 )     (33 )     21,812       32,512       (10,700 )     (33 )
Gross profit percentage     51 %     55 %                     51 %     57 %                

 

Cost of revenues for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018 decreased $1.8 million and $3.8 million, respectively, or 22% and 15%, respectively, as compared to the corresponding periods in 2017. This was primarily driven by a reduction in the number of global services and cloud infrastructure personnel, which for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018 led to decreases of $1.0 million and $1.9 million, respectively, in personnel-related costs, including compensation and benefits expense and travel, as compared to the same periods in 2017. This reduction in headcount also contributed to decreased allocated facilities and information technology costs of $0.1 million and $0.2 million, respectively for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018. We also experienced decreases of $0.1 million and $0.6 million, respectively, in hosting costs during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018, due to a decline in the usage of our hosted platform from the corresponding periods in 2017. Additionally, for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018, depreciation and amortization of internally developed software decreased $0.5 million and $1.1 million, respectively, due primarily to the nature and timing of capital expenditures and internal projects as compared to the corresponding periods in 2017.

 

23

 

Our gross margin decreased to 51% for both the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018, as compared to 55% and 57%, respectively, for the corresponding periods in 2017. This was primarily due to our revenues declining during these periods at a faster rate than the corresponding decreases in costs. Specifically, expenses for compensation and benefits, hosting and facilities and information technology all declined in absolute dollars, but increased as a percentage of revenues, during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018, as compared to the same periods in 2017.

 

Sales and Marketing

 

   

Three Months Ended

September 30,

   

Change

   

Nine Months Ended

September 30,

   

Change

 
   

2018

   

2017

   

$

   

%

   

2018

   

2017

   

$

   

%

 
   

(dollars in thousands)

 
Sales and marketing   $ 5,296     $ 6,630     $ (1,334 )     (20 )%   $ 18,831     $ 20,016     $ (1,185 )     (6 )%
Percent of revenues, net     40 %     36 %                     44 %     35 %                

 

Sales and marketing expenses for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018 decreased $1.3 million and $1.2 million, respectively, or 20% and 6%, respectively, as compared to the corresponding periods in 2017. The decreases were primarily due to a reduction in the global sales support and marketing headcount, including reductions that were part of our restructuring activities during 2018 (Note 5), contributing to net decreases of $1.0 million and $1.4 million, respectively, in personnel-related costs during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018. Due in part to this headcount reduction, we incurred restructuring costs of $0.1 million and $0.7 million, respectively, during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018, as compared to the corresponding periods in the prior year when no restructuring costs were incurred. The remaining decreases during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018, were primarily the result of lower marketing costs of $0.3 million and $0.4 million, respectively, as we cut or shifted the timing of certain of our marketing activities during these periods.

 

Research and Development

 

   

Three Months Ended

September 30,

   

Change

   

Nine Months Ended

September 30,

   

Change

 
   

2018

   

2017

   

$

   

%

   

2018

   

2017

   

$

   

%

 
   

(dollars in thousands)

 
Research and development   $ 5,471     $ 6,672     $ (1,201 )     (18 )%   $ 17,443     $ 20,456     $ (3,013 )     (15 )%
Percent of revenues, net     42 %     37 %                     41 %     36 %                

 

Research and development expenses for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018 decreased $1.2 million and $3.0 million, respectively, or 18% and 15%, respectively, as compared to the corresponding periods in 2017. The decreases were primarily due to a reduction in the number of full-time research and development personnel, resulting in decreases of $0.9 million and $2.4 million, respectively, in compensation expense as compared to the same periods in 2017. The decrease in compensation expense for the nine months ended September 30, 2018 includes a $0.6 million decrease in stock-based compensation expense, driven by employee turnover and the decline in our stock price. The decreases were further driven by lower professional fees of $0.2 million (for both periods) for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018, as we reduced the number of research and development contractors as compared to the corresponding periods in 2017. Additionally, for the nine months ended September 30, 2018, the capitalization of costs as internally developed software increased $0.3 million due to the nature and timing of internal projects as compared to the corresponding period in 2017.

 

General and Administrative

 

   

Three Months Ended

September 30,

   

Change

   

Nine Months Ended

September 30,

   

Change

 
   

2018

   

2017

   

$

   

%

   

2018

   

2017

   

$

   

%

 
   

(dollars in thousands)

 
General and administrative   $ 2,921     $ 3,920     $ (999 )     (25 )%   $ 10,064     $ 12,042     $ (1,978 )     (16 )%
Percent of revenues, net     22 %     22 %                     24 %     21 %                

 

General and administrative expenses for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018 decreased $1.0 million and $2.0 million, respectively, or 25% and 16%, respectively, as compared to the corresponding periods in 2017. These decreases were largely driven by the reduction in our provision for bad debts for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018 of $0.5 million and $1.2 million, respectively, as compared to the same periods in 2017. We reduced our allowance for doubtful accounts by $1.0 million and $1.5 million, respectively, during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018, due largely to improved efforts to collect on long outstanding and reserved receivables. The decreases were further driven by professional fees, which decreased $0.6 million and $0.8 million, respectively, during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018, due primarily to reductions in accounting and legal costs as compared to the corresponding periods in 2017. We reduced these costs through a combination of changing service providers, cutting certain services and shifting the timing of projects.

 

24

 

Impairment of Goodwill

 

   

Three Months Ended

September 30,

   

Change

   

Nine Months Ended

September 30,

   

Change

 
   

2018

   

2017

   

$

   

%

   

2018

   

2017

   

$

   

%

 
   

(dollars in thousands)

 

Impairment of goodwill

    14,740             14,740       100

%

    14,740       2,797       11,943       427

%

Percent of revenues, net

    112

%

   

%

                    34

%

    5

%

               

 

We recorded a goodwill impairment charge of $14.7 million during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018. Refer to Note 4 of the accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements for details of the interim goodwill impairment test we performed to determine this amount. We also recorded a goodwill impairment charge of $2.8 million during the second quarter of 2017.

 

Other Income, Net

 

   

Three Months Ended

September 30,

   

Change

   

Nine Months Ended

September 30,

   

Change

 
   

2018

   

2017

   

$

   

%

   

2018

   

2017

   

$

   

%

 
   

(dollars in thousands)

 
Other income (expenses), net     336       (144 )     480       (333 )%     1,008       (445 )     1,453       (327 )%

 

Other income, net, primarily consists of sublease income recorded under agreements for portions of our San Francisco office space and our Portland office space, with terms through July 2022 and May 2020, respectively, as well as foreign currency transaction gains and losses and interest income and expense. During the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018, we generated sublease income of $0.4 million and $0.9 million, respectively, as compared to $0.3 million and $0.8 million, respectively, during the corresponding periods in 2017. Foreign currency transaction losses were not material for the three months ended September 30, 2018, while foreign currency transaction gains were $0.1 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2018. This compared to foreign currency transaction losses of $0.4 million and $1.0 million, respectively, for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2017.

 

Provision for Income Taxes

 

   

Three Months Ended

September 30,

   

Change

   

Nine Months Ended

September 30,

   

Change

 
   

2018

   

2017

   

$

   

%

   

2018

   

2017

   

$

   

%

 
   

(dollars in thousands)

 
Provision for income taxes   $ (96 )   $ (151 )   $ 55       (36 )%   $ (624 )   $ (976 )   $ 352       (36 )%

 

The provision for income taxes for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018 totaled $0.1 million and $0.6 million, primarily due to profits earned by our wholly owned foreign subsidiaries.

 

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

Since our incorporation in March 2006, we have relied primarily on sales of our capital stock to fund our operating activities. From incorporation until our initial public offering of common stock (“IPO”), we raised $105.7 million, net of related issuance costs, in funding through private placements of our preferred stock. In March and April 2013, we raised net proceeds of $109.3 million in our IPO. From time to time, we have also utilized equipment lines and entered into capital lease arrangements to fund capital purchases. As of September 30, 2018, our principal sources of liquidity were our unrestricted cash and cash equivalents of $13.4 million and our capital lease arrangements. The approximate weighted-average interest rate on our outstanding borrowings as of September 30, 2018 was 6.0%. Our primary operating cash requirements include the payment of compensation and related costs, as well as costs for our facilities and information technology infrastructure.

 

We maintain a $1.3 million irrevocable letter of credit to secure the non-cancelable lease for our corporate headquarters in San Francisco, which was previously collateralized by a revolving credit facility. Following the termination of that facility in December 2016, we were required to restrict $1.3 million of our cash and cash equivalents from use to secure this letter of credit. This balance is reflected as restricted cash on the consolidated balance sheets of the accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

We presently maintain cash balances in our foreign subsidiaries. As of September 30, 2018, we had $13.4 million of cash and cash equivalents in aggregate, of which $9.1 million was held by our foreign subsidiaries. On December 22, 2017, the United States enacted the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (“TCJA”), which instituted fundamental changes to the taxation of multinational corporations. Among these changes is a mandatory one-time transition tax on the deemed repatriation of the accumulated earnings of certain of our foreign subsidiaries. While our application of the accounting for the TCJA is ongoing and currently uncertain, we provisionally estimate that no such tax will be due, as our foreign subsidiaries have accumulated significant losses.

 

If funds held by our foreign subsidiaries were needed for our U.S. operations, we would be required to accrue tax liabilities to repatriate these funds. However, given the amount of our net operating loss carryovers in the United States, such repatriation will most likely not result in material U.S. cash tax payments within the next year. Additionally, we do not believe that foreign withholding taxes associated with repatriating these funds would be material.

 

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Based on our current and anticipated level of operations, including our internal forecasts and projections, we believe that our existing cash and cash equivalents will be sufficient to fund our operations for at least the next 12 months. Our future capital requirements will depend on many factors, including our efforts to improve revenue performance, the timing and extent of spending to support product development efforts and the timing of introductions of new features and enhancements to our platform. To the extent that existing cash and cash equivalents are insufficient to fund our future activities, we may need to raise additional funds through public or private equity or debt financing. Further actions to reduce costs may also be necessary, such as additional significant restructurings like the one initiated in January 2018 (see Note 5 of the accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements), which is expected to result in annualized cost savings of approximately $6.0 million to $7.0 million.

 

Summary of Cash Flows

 

The following table sets forth a summary of our cash flows for the periods indicated:

 

   

Nine Months Ended September 30,

 
   

2018

   

2017

 
   

(in thousands)

 
Net cash used in operating activities   $ (10,776 )   $ (4,255 )
Net cash used in investing activities     (2,270 )     (1,738 )
Net cash used in financing activities     (859 )     (785 )

Effect of foreign exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents and restricted cash

    (242 )     1,714  
Net decrease in cash and cash equivalents and restricted cash   $ (14,147 )   $ (5,064 )

 

Operating Activities

 

Cash used in operating activities is primarily influenced by the amount of cash we invest in personnel and infrastructure to support the operation of our business and the fluctuations in the number of advertisers using our platform. Cash used in operating activities has typically been affected by net losses and further increased by changes in our operating assets and liabilities, particularly in the areas of accounts receivable, prepaid expenses and other assets, accounts payable and accrued expenses and other current liabilities, adjusted for non-cash expense items such as depreciation, amortization, stock-based compensation expense and deferred income tax benefits.

 

Cash used in operating activities during the nine months ended September 30, 2018 of $10.8 million was primarily the result of a net loss of $38.9 million, adjusted for non-cash expenses of $26.1 million, which primarily included impairment of goodwill, depreciation, amortization, unrealized foreign currency gains, stock-based compensation expense and recovery from bad debts. This was further increased by a net change in working capital items of $2.0 million, most notably (1) a decrease in accounts receivable of $3.8 million due to the timing of related collections; (2) an increase in prepaid expenses and other assets (both current and non-current) of $0.8 million related to the timing of related disbursements and (3) a decrease in accounts payable and accrued expenses and other liabilities (both current and non-current) of $0.9 million due to the timing of related disbursements and customer advances.

 

Cash used in operating activities during the nine months ended September 30, 2017 of $4.5 million was primarily the result of a net loss of $24.2 million, adjusted for non-cash expenses of $16.9 million, which primarily included impairment of goodwill, depreciation, amortization, unrealized foreign currency losses, stock-based compensation expense and provision for bad debts. This was further offset by a $2.9 million net change in working capital items, most notably (1) a decrease in accounts receivable of $4.8 million due to the timing of related collections; (2) an increase in prepaid expenses and other assets (both current and non-current) of $1.1 million related to the timing of related disbursements and (3) a decrease in accounts payable and accrued expenses and other liabilities (both current and non-current) of $0.7 million due to the timing of related disbursements and customer advances.

 

Investing Activities

 

During the nine months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017, investing activities primarily consisted of purchases of property and equipment, including leasehold improvements, technology hardware and software to support our business, as well as capitalized internally developed software costs. Purchases of property and equipment may vary from period-to-period due to the timing of our operational requirements and the development cycles of our internally-developed hosted software platform. We expect to continue to invest in the development of our software platform for the foreseeable future.

 

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Financing Activities

 

Cash used in financing activities during the nine months ended September 30, 2018 was $0.9 million. This was primarily due to $1.0 million of net repayments under our capital lease arrangements and $0.1 million in employee taxes paid for withheld shares upon the settlement of equity awards, partially offset by $0.2 million of proceeds from net contributions to the 2013 Employee Stock Purchase Plan (“2013 ESPP”).

 

Cash used in financing activities during the nine months ended September 30, 2017 was $0.8 million. This was primarily due to $0.8 million of net repayments under our capital lease arrangements and $0.2 million in employee taxes paid for withheld shares upon the settlement of equity awards, partially offset by $0.2 million of proceeds from net contributions to the 2013 ESPP.

 

Contractual Obligations and Commitments

 

There were no material changes outside the ordinary course of business during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018 to the contractual obligations and commitments disclosed in our Annual Report on Form 10-K, as amended, for the fiscal year 2017 filed with the SEC on March 5, 2018, under “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.”

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

During the periods presented, we did not have, nor do we currently have, any relationships with unconsolidated entities or financial partnerships, such as entities often referred to as structured finance or special purpose entities, which would have been established for the purpose of facilitating off-balance sheet arrangements or other contractually narrow or limited purposes. We are therefore not exposed to any financing, liquidity, market or credit risk that could arise if we had engaged in those types of relationships.

 

We have no obligations that meet the definition of an off-balance sheet arrangement as of September 30, 2018, other than operating leases and related subleases, as described in the Notes to the unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements, and the irrevocable letter of credit described in the “Liquidity and Capital Resources” section above.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

For information regarding recent accounting pronouncements, refer to Note 1, Summary of Business and Significant Accounting Policies, within our unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

Critical Accounting Policies and Significant Judgments and Estimates

 

The discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations is based upon our unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States. The preparation of these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements requires us to make estimates, assumptions and judgments that can have significant impact on the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, revenues and expenses, and related disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements. These items are monitored and analyzed by us for changes in facts and circumstances, and material changes in these estimates could occur in the future.

 

We believe the estimates, assumptions and judgments involved in revenue recognition, stock-based compensation, accounting for income taxes, reserving for doubtful accounts receivable, business combinations and impairment assessments of our goodwill, intangible assets and other long-lived assets have the greatest potential impact on our unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements, and consider these to be our critical accounting policies. Historically, our estimates, assumptions and judgments relative to our critical accounting policies have not differed materially from actual results.

 

Other than the changes to revenue recognition under ASC 606 (Note 2), there have been no material changes to our critical accounting policies and significant judgments and estimates as compared to the critical accounting policies and significant judgments and estimates as described in our Annual Report on Form 10-K, as amended, for the fiscal year 2017 filed with the SEC on March 5, 2018, under “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.”

 

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Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.

 

We have operations both within the United States and internationally and we are exposed to market risks in the ordinary course of our business. These risks primarily include interest rate, foreign exchange and inflation risks, as well as risks relating to changes in the general economic conditions in the countries where we conduct business. To manage certain of these risks, we monitor the financial condition of our large customers and limit credit exposure by setting credit limits as we deem appropriate. In addition, our investment strategy has been to invest in financial instruments that are highly liquid and readily convertible into cash, with maturity dates within three months from the date of purchase. To date, we have not used derivative instruments to mitigate the impact of our market risk exposures. We have also not used, nor do we intend to use, derivatives for trading or speculative purposes.

 

Interest Rate Risk

 

We are exposed to market risk related to changes in interest rates. Our investments are considered cash equivalents and primarily consist of money market funds. As of September 30, 2018, we had cash and cash equivalents of $13.4 million. The carrying amount of our cash and cash equivalents reasonably approximates fair value, due to the short maturities of these investments. The primary objectives of our investment activities are the preservation of capital, the fulfillment of liquidity needs and the fiduciary control of cash and investments. We do not enter into investments for trading or speculative purposes. Our investments are exposed to fluctuations in interest rates, which may affect our interest income and the fair market value of our investments. Due to the short-term nature of our investment portfolio, we believe only dramatic fluctuations in interest rates would have a material effect on our investments. As such we do not expect our operating results or cash flows to be materially affected by a sudden change in market interest rates.

 

As of September 30, 2018, we had an aggregate of $2.1 million in capital lease obligations outstanding. These capital lease obligations carry fixed interest rates that range from 5.2% to 7.9%. A hypothetical 10% increase or decrease in interest rates relative to our current interest rates would not have a material impact on the fair values of all of our outstanding capital lease obligations. Changes in interest rates would, however, affect operating results and cash flows because of the variable rate nature of our obligations. A hypothetical 10% increase or decrease in interest rates relative to interest rates as of September 30, 2018, would result in an insignificant impact to interest expense for 2018.

 

Foreign Currency Exchange Risk

 

We have foreign currency risks related to our revenues and operating expenses denominated in currencies other than the United States Dollar, primarily the Euro, British Pound Sterling, Singapore Dollar, Japanese Yen, Chinese Yuan and Australian Dollar. Revenues outside of the United States as a percentage of consolidated revenues were 32% and 34%, respectively, for the nine months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017. Changes in exchange rates may negatively affect our revenues and other operating results as expressed in U.S. Dollars. Aggregate foreign currency gains (losses) included in determining net loss were less than $(0.1) million and $0.1 million, respectively, for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018, and $(0.4) million and $(1.0) million, respectively, for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2017. Transaction gains and losses are included in other income (expenses), net.

 

If our international operations grow, our risks associated with fluctuation in currency rates will become greater, and we will continue to reassess our approach to managing this risk. In addition, currency fluctuations or a weakening U.S. Dollar can increase the costs of our international expansion, while a strengthening U.S. Dollar can negatively impact our international revenues. To date, we have not entered into any foreign currency hedging contracts. Based on our current international structure, we do not plan on engaging in hedging activities in the near future, and we also do not expect that the effects of a 10% shift in a single foreign currency exchange rate would have a material impact on any of our currently-held financial instruments.

 

Inflation Risk

 

We do not believe that inflation has had a material effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations. Nonetheless, if our costs were to become subject to significant inflationary pressures, we may not be able to fully offset such higher costs through price increases. Our inability or failure to do so could harm our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

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Item 4. Controls and Procedures.

 

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

We maintain disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Exchange Act), which are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in the reports we file or submit under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms, and that such information is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our Principal Executive Officer (our Chief Executive Officer) and Principal Financial Officer (our Chief Financial Officer), or persons performing similar functions, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required or necessary disclosures.

 

Our management, with the participation of our Principal Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer, evaluated the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures as of the end of the period covered by this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q. Based on that evaluation, our Principal Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were effective at a reasonable assurance level as of September 30, 2018.

 

Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting

 

As of the end of the period covered by this Quarterly Report, our Principal Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer did not identify any change in our internal control over financial reporting during the fiscal quarter covered by this Quarterly Report that materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

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PART II

OTHER INFORMATION

 

ITEM 1. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

 

From time to time, we may become involved in legal proceedings arising in the ordinary course of our business. We are not presently a party to any legal proceedings that, if determined adversely to us, would individually or taken together have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results, financial condition or cash flows.

 

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

 

Our operations and financial results are subject to various risks and uncertainties, including those described below, which could adversely affect our business, results of operations, cash flows, financial conditions, and the trading price of our common stock.

 

Risks Related to Our Business

 

We have a history of losses and we may not achieve or sustain profitability in the future.

 

We have incurred significant losses in each fiscal year since our incorporation in 2006. We experienced a net loss of $31.5 million during 2017, and a net loss of $38.9 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2018. As of September 30, 2018, we had an accumulated deficit of $262.4 million. The losses and accumulated deficit were due in part to the substantial investments we made to grow our business and acquire customers. Our cost of revenues and operating expenses could increase in the future due to investments to grow our business, acquire customers and develop our platform and new functionality. These efforts may prove more expensive than we currently anticipate, and we may not succeed in increasing our revenues sufficiently to offset these higher expenses. Many of our efforts to generate revenues from our business are new and unproven, and any failure to increase our revenues or generate revenues from new solutions or to maintain or increase revenues from existing products and customers could prevent us from attaining or increasing profitability. Furthermore, to the extent we are successful in increasing our customer base, we also could incur increased losses because costs associated with entering into customer contracts are generally incurred up front, while customers are billed over the term of the contract generally through our usage-based pricing model. We do not expect to be profitable in 2018 on the basis of generally accepted accounting principles in the United States, or GAAP, and we cannot be certain that we will be able to attain profitability on a quarterly or annual basis, or if we do, that we will sustain profitability.

 

We expect to continue to incur losses and experience negative cash flows, and may need to sell additional securities, borrow additional funds or reduce operating expenses to continue as a going concern.

 

We currently operate at a loss and we anticipate that we will continue to have operating losses in the near term. Our business has not generated enough cash flow to fund our sales and marketing activities, research and development initiatives, and other business activities. We anticipate that increasing our market share for our current services through sales and marketing efforts, continuing development of new platform features and delivering efficient service to customers will require additional capital and expenditures. If we continue to burn cash without a corresponding increase to revenue, we will need to sell additional securities or borrow additional funds or reduce operating expenses through successful cost-cutting measures to continue as a going concern. There is no guarantee that we will be able to issue additional securities in future periods or borrow additional funds on commercially reasonable terms, or at all, in order to meet our cash needs. Further, there is no guarantee that we will be able to successfully reduce our operating expenses through successful cost-cutting measures. Our ability to continue as a going concern may be adversely affected if we are unable to raise additional cash or reduce our operating expenses.

 

We might require additional capital to support business growth, and this capital might not be available on acceptable terms, if at all.

 

We intend to continue to make investments to support our business growth and may require additional funds to respond to business challenges, including the need to develop new features or enhance our existing platform, improve our operating infrastructure or acquire complementary businesses and technologies. Accordingly, we may need to engage in equity or debt financings to secure additional funds. If we raise additional funds through further issuances of equity or convertible debt securities, our existing stockholders could suffer significant dilution, and any new equity securities we issue could have rights, preferences and privileges superior to those of holders of our common stock. Any debt financing secured by us in the future could involve restrictive covenants relating to our capital raising activities and other financial and operational matters, which may make it more difficult for us to obtain additional capital and to pursue business opportunities, including potential acquisitions. In addition, we may not be able to obtain additional financing on terms favorable to us, if at all. If we are unable to obtain adequate financing or financing on terms satisfactory to us, when we require it, our ability to continue to support our business growth and to respond to business challenges could be significantly impaired.

 

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We operate in a rapidly developing and changing industry, which makes it difficult to evaluate our current business and future prospects.

 

We have encountered and will continue to encounter risks and difficulties frequently experienced by companies in rapidly developing and changing industries, including challenges in forecasting accuracy, hiring and retaining qualified employees, determining appropriate investments of our limited resources, market acceptance of our existing and future solutions, effectively integrating acquired products, competition from established companies with greater financial and technical resources, acquiring and retaining customers, managing customer deployments, making improvements to our existing products and developing new solutions. Our current operations infrastructure may require changes in order for us to achieve profitability and scale our operations efficiently. For example, we may need to automate portions of our solution to decrease our costs, ensure our marketing infrastructure is designed to drive highly qualified leads cost effectively and implement changes in our sales model to improve the predictability of our sales and reduce our sales cycle. In addition, from time to time, we may need to make additional investments in product development to address market demands, which may increase our overall expenses and reduce our ability to achieve profitability. If we fail to implement these changes in a timely manner or are unable to implement them due to factors beyond our control, our business may suffer, our revenue may decline and we may not be able to achieve growth or profitability. We cannot be assured that we will be successful in addressing these and other challenges we may face in the future.

 

Our usage-based pricing model makes it difficult to forecast revenues from our current customers and future prospects.

 

We primarily have a usage-based pricing model in which most of our fees are calculated as a percentage of customers’ advertising spend managed on our platform. This pricing model makes it difficult to accurately forecast revenues because our customers’ advertising spend managed by our platform may vary from month to month based on the variety of industries in which our advertisers operate, the seasonality of those industries and fluctuations in our customers’ advertising budgets or other factors. Our subscription contracts with our direct advertiser customers generally contain a minimum monthly platform fee, which is generally greater than one-half of our estimated monthly revenues from the customer at the time the contract is signed, and, as a result, the minimum monthly platform fee may not be a good indicator of our revenues from that customer. In addition, advertisers that use our platform through our agency customers typically do not have a minimum monthly spend amount or a minimum term during which they must use our platform, and as a result, our ability to forecast revenues from these advertisers is difficult. If we incorrectly forecast revenues for these advertisers and the amount of revenue is less than projections we provide to investors, the price of our common stock could decline substantially. Additionally, if we overestimate usage, we may incur additional expenses in adding infrastructure, without a commensurate increase in revenues, which would harm our gross margins and other operating results.

 

We must develop and introduce enhancements and new features that achieve market acceptance or that keep pace with technological developments to remain competitive in our evolving industry.

 

We operate in a dynamic market characterized by rapidly changing technologies and industry and legal standards. The introduction of new advertising platform solutions by our competitors, the market acceptance of solutions based on new or alternative technologies, or the emergence of new industry standards could render our platform obsolete. Our ability to compete successfully, attract new customers and increase revenues from existing customers depends in large part on our ability to enhance and improve our existing cross-channel, cross-device, enterprise marketing software platform and to continually introduce or acquire new features that are in demand by the market we serve. We also must update our software to reflect changes in publishers’ APIs and terms of use. We are in the process of a significant upgrade to our software platform infrastructure, and the success of this project or any other enhancement or new solution depends on several factors, including timely completion, adequate quality testing, effective migration of existing customers with minimal disruption and appropriate introduction and market acceptance. Any new platform or feature that we develop or acquire may not be introduced in a timely manner, may contain defects, may be more costly to compete than we anticipate or may not achieve the broad market acceptance necessary to generate significant revenues. If we are unable to complete the upgrade to our software platform infrastructure effectively or in a timely manner, or to anticipate or timely and successfully develop or acquire new offerings or features or enhance our existing platform to meet customer requirements, our business and operating results will be adversely affected.

 

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If the market for digital advertising slows or declines, our business, growth prospects, and financial condition would be adversely affected.

 

The future growth of our business could be constrained by the level of acceptance and expansion of emerging cloud-based advertising channels, as well as the continued use and growth of existing channels, such as search and display advertising. Even if these channels become widely adopted, advertisers and agencies may not make significant investments in solutions such as ours that help them manage their digital advertising spend across publisher platforms and advertising channels. It is difficult to predict customer adoption rates, customer demand for our platform, the future growth rate and size of the advertising cloud solutions market or the entry of competitive solutions. The continued expansion of the market for advertising cloud solutions depends on a number of factors, including the continued growth of the cloud-based advertising market, the growth of social and mobile as advertising channels and the cost, performance and perceived value associated with advertising cloud solutions, as well as the ability of cloud computing companies to address security and privacy concerns. Further, the cloud computing market is less developed in many jurisdictions outside the United States. If we or other cloud computing providers experience security incidents, loss of customer data, disruptions in delivery or other problems, the market for cloud computing as a whole, including our applications, may be negatively affected.

 

If we are unable to maintain our relationships with, and access to, publishers, advertising exchange platforms and other platforms that aggregate the supply of advertising inventory, our business will suffer.

 

We currently depend on relationships with various publishers, including Amazon, Baidu, Bing, Facebook, Google, Instagram, Pinterest, Twitter, Yahoo! and Yahoo! Japan, as well as advertising exchange platforms and aggregators of advertising inventory, including Google’s DoubleClick Ad Exchange, Yahoo! Gemini, Facebook’s Exchange, Microsoft’s Ad Exchange, Twitter’s MoPub, OpenX, The Rubicon Project, PubMatic and AppNexus. Our subscription services interface with these publishers’ platforms through APIs, such as the Google AdWords API or Facebook API. We are subject to the respective platforms’ standard API terms and conditions, which govern the use and distribution of data from these platforms. Our business significantly depends on having access to these APIs, particularly the Google AdWords API, which the substantial majority of our customers use, on commercially reasonable terms and our business would be harmed if any of these publishers, advertising exchanges or aggregators of advertising inventory discontinues or limits access to their platforms, modifies their terms of use or other policies or place additional restrictions on us as API users, or charges API license fees for API access. Moreover, some of these publishers, such as Google, market competitive solutions for their platforms. Because the advertising inventory suppliers control their APIs, they may develop competitive offerings that are not subject to the limits imposed on us through the API terms and conditions. Currently, restrictions in these API agreements limit our ability to implement certain functionality, require us to implement functionality in a particular manner or require us to implement certain required minimum functionality, causing us to devote development resources to implement certain functionality that we would not otherwise include in our subscription services and to incur costs for personnel to provide services to implement functionality that we are prohibited from automating. Publishers, advertising exchanges and advertising inventory aggregators update their API terms of use from time to time and new versions of these terms could impose additional restrictions on us. In addition, publishers, advertising exchanges and advertising inventory aggregators continually update their APIs and may update or modify functionality, which requires us to modify our software to accommodate these changes and to devote technical resources and personnel to these efforts which could otherwise be used to focus on other priorities. Any of these outcomes could cause demand for our products to decrease, our research and development costs to increase, and our results of operations and financial condition to be harmed.

 

Our growth depends in part on the success of our relationships with advertising agencies.

 

Our future growth will depend, in part, on our ability to enter into successful relationships with advertising agencies. Identifying agencies and negotiating and documenting relationships with them requires significant time and resources. These relationships may not result in additional customers or enable us to generate significant revenues. Our contracts for these relationships are typically non-exclusive and do not prohibit the agency from working with our competitors or from offering competing services. Frequently, these agencies do in fact work with our competitors and compete with us. In addition, we often work with, or seek to work with, high-profile brands directly. This may not be possible where, for example, those brands obtain advertising services exclusively or primarily from advertising agencies.

 

We generally bill agencies for their customers’ use of our platform, but in most cases the agency’s customer has no direct contractual commitment to make payment to us. Furthermore, some of these agency contracts include provisions whereby the agency is not liable for making payment to us for our subscription services if the agency does not receive a corresponding payment from its client on whose behalf the subscription services were rendered. These provisions may result in longer collections periods or our inability to collect payment for some of our subscription services. If we are unsuccessful in establishing or maintaining our relationships with these agencies on commercially reasonable terms, or if these relationships are not profitable for us, our ability to compete in the marketplace or to grow our revenues could be impaired and our operating results would suffer.

 

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We may not be able to compete successfully against current and future competitors.

 

The overall market for advertising cloud solutions is rapidly evolving, highly competitive, complex, fragmented, and subject to changing technology and shifting customer needs. We face significant competition in this market and we expect competition to intensify in the future. We currently compete with large, well-established companies, such as Adobe Systems Incorporated and Google Inc. (through its wholly owned subsidiary DoubleClick), and privately-held companies, such as Kenshoo Ltd. We also compete with channel-specific offerings, in-house proprietary tools, tools from publishers and custom solutions, including spreadsheets. Increased competition may result in reduced pricing for our solutions, longer sales cycles or a decrease of our market share, any of which could negatively affect our revenues and future operating result